Epinephrine (Adrenaline)

People have referred to adrenaline as being a double-edged sword... that adrenaline can restart the heart but in doing so it's not good for the brain - Gavin Perkins MD, lead investigator PARAMEDIC2

Epinephrine (Adrenaline)
Epinephrine (Adrenaline)

image by: Ecole des sciences infirmières de Mahdia

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PARAMEDIC2: Epinephrine in Cardiac Arrest Is Good for Survival, Bad for the Brain

In the largest randomized, placebo-controlled trial of its kind, use of epinephrine (adrenaline) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was associated with a small increase in survival at 30 days, but at the expense of worse neurological impairment.

The findings call into question a drug that has been a mainstay for resuscitation outside of hospitals for more than 50 years and should prompt some soul-searching among policy makers around the globe in terms of which outcomes are most valued, investigators say.

 

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 PARAMEDIC2: Epinephrine in Cardiac Arrest Is Good for Survival, Bad for the Brain

Ten years in the making, randomized trial results on a half-century-old resuscitation mainstay should spur a sober look at societal beliefs and values. “People have referred to adrenaline as being a double-edged sword and in fact that's what this trial has shown, that adrenaline can restart the heart but in doing so it's not good for the brain,” lead investigator Gavin Perkins.

ScienceDirect

Epinephrine (also known as adrenaline) is a neurotransmitter in the sense that, within the brain, it help neurons to communicate with one another. However, because epinephrine is mainly produced by the adrenal glands and has functions peripherally (i.e., outside the brain), it can also be considered a hormone.

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