Athlete's Foot

Anyone can pick up the fungus, but the thing to keep in mind is that it grows really well in a warm, dark, moist environment. That's the inside of a shoe - Bob Neinast

Athlete's Foot
Athlete's Foot

image by: Fungisol

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How Likely Am I to Catch Athlete's Foot, Really?

As a fitness editor, I run around New York as part of my job testing out new classes and working out with trainers from all over the country. Recently, I realized that I've been showering way more at the studios than I have at my own apartment, which made me pause. I've heard about the risks of foot fungus, especially athlete's foot, since I was a child, but I've never taken the whole “must wear shower shoes” thing very seriously. However, after having another editor stop dead in her tracks when I told her I don’t normally wear them, I felt like I should reconsider.

We’ve all heard about the risks when you walk into a public shower or locker room sans shoes—specifically, athlete’s…

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 How Likely Am I to Catch Athlete's Foot, Really?

I've heard about the risks of foot fungus, especially athlete's foot, since I was a child, but I've never taken the whole “must wear shower shoes” thing very seriously. However, after having another editor stop dead in her tracks when I told her I don’t normally wear them, I felt like I should reconsider.

4 Best Athlete's Foot Cream

Dealing with athlete’s foot can feel like a losing battle, but the best athlete’s foot creams on the market can help you tackle all of the irritating skin condition's most infamous symptoms — from peeling skin to discolored toenails to blisters — all without a prescription from your doctor.

Judging Athlete's Foot Cures

Of the handful of over-the-counter products that claim to kill the fungus, several doctors recommend Lamisil, which is made by Novartis and costs between $10 to $15 a bottle. Lamisil's active ingredient is a 1% solution of terbinafine hydrochloride, which is fungicidal, meaning it kills fungus, while other products merely inhibit the growth of new spores, doctors say. Lamisil was available only with a prescription until 1999, meaning its fungal-fighting agents are newer and stronger than those of older products. Lotrimin Ultra, made by Schering-Plough, uses a similar compound, butenafide hydrochloride, and is sold for between $15 and $17. It went over-the-counter in 2002.

Harvard Health

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, is a common foot infection caused by fungi called dermatophytes. Found in many different places indoors and outdoors, dermatophytes are especially common in the warm, moist environments of pools, showers, locker rooms and other sports facilities, where people walk with bare feet. Once dermatophytes contaminate the skin of a foot, the warm, moist environment of sweaty socks and shoes encourages them to grow.

NHS

Athlete's foot is a common fungal infection that affects the feet. You can usually treat it with creams, sprays or powders from a pharmacy, but it can keep coming back.

TeensHealth

When fungus grows on the feet, it is called athlete's foot (or tinea pedis). It got this name because it affects people whose feet tend to be damp and sweaty, which is often the case with athletes. But anyone can get this infection. Other fungal skin infections include jock itch and ringworm (despite its name, ringworm is not a worm). These infections are caused by several types of mold-like fungi called dermatophytes (pronounced: der-MAH-tuh-fites) that live on the dead tissues of your skin, hair, and nails.

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